Flight Papers

feminism and creativity, art, madness, and play

A Quick Survival Horror Dogs Hack


Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/public/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 74

Survival Horror has been on my brain, a bit. Dogs, too, has been rattling around there. Do they blend?

I haven’t spike tested this yet, though I rather want to. It could probably also use an injection of Afraid’s conditions, and some un-Afraid-like situation creation.

First, lose Relationships.

Second, gain Anchors. Anchors are the people you’re surviving for. The characters’ anchors aren’t constructed as opposed, but the bare facts of the situation are going to bring them into conflict. They should probably be really understandable, sympathetic connections. Connections that even in the worst of times, nobody is going to say, “just forget it! run!”—or, if they do, they’ll feel shitty about it. They’re just going to end up being really understandable, sympathetic connections that drive you to do things opposed to your basic survival, and by proxy the survival of your group. The kids in 28 Weeks loved their home, their mother, and each other. That went not so well.

Start with 5d8 spread amongst four Anchors. You can use them like traits, but it’s one Anchor per conflict, period. You always have five dice spread amongst your Anchors. When you lose an Anchor, knock off one die size and redistribute dice amongst the remaining (so you have 5d8, then 5d6…).

Losing anchors should make you cling to the ones you have more tightly. This should look like desperation, not madness.

NPCs are important, too. They should reflect the fucked-upedness of the situation with their pathologies, but they should be people the characters want to help, or at least people whose help the characters desperately need.

Helping people should start out sounding like a good idea, and slowly become more and more of a liability; the situation creation rules should account for this, somehow.

Escalation involves bringing The Monsters closer:

d4s — whisper about them without names,
d6s — speak their names and your likely fate,
d8s — see and touch them,
d10s — run into the fray, or cut open the doors and let them in.

There should be group fallout as well as individual fallout, somehow.

4 Responses to “A Quick Survival Horror Dogs Hack”

  1. Paul Tevis Says:

    Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/public/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 74

    Interesting. I’ve played two sessions of Carl Rigney’s Zombies in the Vineyard hack (http://www.flick.com/~cdr/rpg/zomv/), and while that takes a different approach than what you’ve suggested here, I’d be curious to try your take as well.

  2. Carl’s Got the Bug « One Thousand One Says:

    Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/public/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 74

    […] Got the Bug 17Jul07 So over at Flight Papers, Paul Tevis linked to Carl Rigney’s Zombies in the Vineyard, which may be the earliest Dogs […]

  3. Flight Papers » Blog Archive » I am a space cadet whose chest is about to burst open Says:

    Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/public/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 74

    […] Flight Papers feminism and creativity, art, madness, and play « A Quick Survival Horror Dogs Hack […]

  4. Sharing the Plague « secret wars Says:

    Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/public/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 74

    […] Vincent Baker, Afraid - Ashi, A Quick Survival Horror Dogs Hack - Carl Rigney, Zombies in the Vineyard - Eric Provost, The […]

Leave a Reply